TRIGGER HIPPY: TRIGGER HIPPY

(ROUNDER RECORDS/CONCORD RECORDS; 2014)

Trigger Hippy cover

So, what’s a fella to do when his band is prone to rather lengthy bouts of inactivity based on the whims and hubris of the brothers that front the band? Well, if you’re the Black Crowe’s drummer, Steve Gorman, you form a band of your own, enlisting the group of musicians with which you would most want to collaborate. That’s exactly what Steve did in 2009, when he founded Trigger Hippy with fellow Crowe member, guitarist Audley Freed, Widespread Panic guitarist Jimmy Herring and Nashville session bassist Nick Govrik. Herring and Freed eventually departed (as did Freed’s replacement, Will Kimbrough), due to outside commitments, and the group solidified around Gorman, Grovnik, ace session guitarist Tom Bukovac and the duel lead vocal powers of Jackie Greene (who also provides guitar and keyboards) and Joan Osborne… a veritable super group of seasoned, in-demand players. The sound on their debut record is solid Southern Rock ‘n’ Soul (think Lynyrd Skynyrd – or the post-crash offshoot, Rossington Collins Band – spiced with a touch of Wet Willie and Little Feat and a whole lot of Stax Records funky rhythm and blues), a true band effort, as Gorman relates: “Sure, you can see this as a ‘player’s band,’ but it really is a BAND, in the true sense of that word.”

Trigger Hippy (Tom Bukovac, Steve Gorman, Nicj Govrik, Joan Osborne, Jackie Greene) (photo credit: JACOB BLICKENSTAFF

Trigger Hippy (Tom Bukovac, Steve Gorman, Nicj Govrik, Joan Osborne, Jackie Greene) (photo credit: JACOB BLICKENSTAFF

The album kicks off with the celebratory, anthemic “Rise Up Singing,” a gospel-tinged song driven by a vibrant organ and hand claps. Aside from the previously mentioned influences, you can also hear touches of Delaney and Bonnie and even – believe it or not – a little Three Dog Night and latter day Fleetwood Mac. “Turpentine” is a Black Crowes type rocker with a deep, pumping bass, powerful drumming, smooth harmony vocals and Skynyrd-esque double lead guitars, with an unforgettably cool harmonic riff. The slow, plaintive “Heartache On the Line” marks the end of a deep love and a long relationship, with Jackie’s organ infusing just the right touch of melancholy to the song. That melancholy is matched by the vocal performances by Greene and Joan Osborne; especially effective are the lyrics in the chorus: “You and me, babe/We got history/It ain’t everything we asked for/But it’s everything we need/You and me, babe/We got nothin’ but time/Well, the kids are grown/And the money’s all gone/It’s heartache on the line.” Steve’s drumming, as usual, is spot on and Bukovac’s solo perfectly relates the feeling of dissolution. “Cave Hill Cemetary” features a solo Joan’s rather ragged sounding vocal over a funky guitar/organ groove. The pumping rhythm, supplied by Gorman, Nick Govric and Greene, and the blistering leads and solo from Tom catapults this one into the rarified air occupied by Al Jackson Junior, Lewie Steinberg (and, later, Donald Dunn), Booker T Jones and Steve Cropper (uh… Booker T and the MGs, if you didn’t know). “Tennessee Mud” is a swampy, muscular number that sonically evokes such acts as Mountain, Mother’s Finest and a bit of Ram Jam’s version of Huddie “Leadbelly” Ledbetter’s Blues stomp, “Black Betty.” The second, primarily instrumental, half of the track absolutely screams “jam band” but, in a totally cool, acceptable way. There’s a great give-and-take from Joan and Jackie on the ballad “Pretty Mess,” that pays off beautifully with the harmony vocals on the chorus. Bukovac’s semi-acoustic guitar adds to the depth of the number with its ringing tone.

Trigger Hippy (Jackie Greene, Joan Osborne, Steve Gorman, Nick Govrick, Tom Bukovac) (photo credit: JACOB BLICKENSTAFF)

Trigger Hippy (Jackie Greene, Joan Osborne, Steve Gorman, Nick Govrick, Tom Bukovac) (photo credit: JACOB BLICKENSTAFF)

“Pocahontas” is one of the funkier tunes here, with a slithering, snaky guitar coda, kinda like Gary Rossington and Stevie Ray Vaughan fronting Sly’s Family Stone. Greene’s clavinet brings a Stevie Wonder-esque funk to the proceedings, while another solo vocal performance from Osborne proves why she is one of the preeminent ladies of this type of soulful rock ‘n’ roll. While I was rather expecting a cover of the Blackfoot tune, “Dry County” has the quintet firing on all cylinders as they build off of the David Bowie/John Lennon groove of “Fame.” As the song progresses, the guitars toughen up as the deep bottom end from Steve and Nick seems to gain new momentum into the instrumental section; with guest Ian Fitchuk providing keyboard support, we are treated to a harmonica solo from Jackie Greene, while his and Joan’s singing are lifted to new heights, teasing each other with lines like: “I know you got it/But you can’t spare it/What I gotta do to get you to share it/It’s like living in a dry county/Trying to get a little bit of your love.” The spry playing and almost joyful singing on “Nothing New” belies the hurt in the lyrics. There’s a lot happening here that could easily go unnoticed if left in the hands of another producer (Bukovac co-produced with input from the rest of Trigger Hippy): The track starts with a guitar signature that’s right out of the Derek Saint Holmes playbook as a prudent use of the cowbell marks time before the vocals come in; a great boogie woogie piano cuts through at times, augmenting the continually stellar guitar work. Another slinky groove propels “Ain’t Persuaded Yet,” as Osborne’s character pleads her case to a jealous lover: “’Oh, I never would step out on you/Now what you heard, it just ain’t true/Baby, don’t something you’ll regret.’/He said, ‘Your words are sweet/But I ain’t persuaded yet.’” As wicked sounding guitars and organ weave in and out of the mix, a buoyant, rock steady bass holds the groove, allowing Gorman to get a little adventurous with the percussion. Sounding like the flip side to the last cut, “Adelaide” is a sad, rootsy lament, with Greene’s high lonesome voice; the emotions seem genuine and are definitely effective. The almost dirge-like music comes together with a rolling drum beat, steady, solid bass, and grief-stricken harmonica, organ and banjo (though not credited, I would imagine that the banjo is courtesy of Tom Bukovac).

Trigger Hippy (Tom Bukovac, Steve Gorman, Nick Govrik, Joan Osborne, Jackie Greene) (photo credit: JACOB BLICKENSTAFF)

Trigger Hippy (Tom Bukovac, Steve Gorman, Nick Govrik, Joan Osborne, Jackie Greene) (photo credit: JACOB BLICKENSTAFF)

I’ve always been a fan of the Black Crowes but, honestly, if Trigger Hippy can continue producing the type of music presented on their debut, I won’t be too sad if the Robinson brothers permanently retire the group. The vocal interplay between Joan Osborne and Jackie Greene is exceptional, the rhythm section is tight and I can certainly see why Bukovac won the MUSIC ROW Session Guitarist of the Year award for five consecutive years; the man is absolutely brilliant… a true player’s player. The songwriting by the band, collectively and singularly (and, occasionally augmented by former guitarist Audley Freed), is superb. If I were to do a Top 10 of 2014, TRIGGER HIPPY would undoubtedly be near the top of the list.


FROM LIVERPOOL TO MEMPHIS: THE JOEY MOLLAND INTERVIEW

PART ONE: INTRODUCTION

Joey Molland , circa 2013 (uncredited photo)

Joey Molland , circa 2013 (uncredited photo)

Joey Molland has known the highs and lows that comes from a life in music. He’s experienced those same highs and lows in his personal life, as well. Born in 1947, by the early 1960s, a teenage Molland was performing in bands around his hometown of Liverpool. Playing with the Assassins and the Profiles led to Joey joining a group called the Masterminds in 1965. Members of the Rolling Stones and their manager/producer, Andrew Loog Oldham, heard the group play at a club. Oldham was impressed enough to produce and release a single on his Immediate label. From the Masterminds, Joey became part of a backing band for the Merseys (Tony Crane and Bill Kinsley, formerly of the Merseybeats) called the Fruit Eating Bears. A stint in the Cryin’ Shames led to an opportunity for Molland to show off his songwriting abilities with Gary Wilson and the Rain.

When the Rain washed away, he was offered a spot with a group called the Iveys. The band had been recording music for a movie soundtrack, to be released on the Beatles’ Apple Records. Before the album MAGIC CHRISTIAN MUSIC was released, the Iveys became Badfinger and, though Joey’s name appears in the album credits, he didn’t appear on any of the tracks. The band, including Molland, however, had already begun working on the follow-up, a more proper album from Badfinger. Guitarist/singer Pete Ham, bassist Tome Evans and Joey played on various sessions for solo Beatles projects aside from their work in Badfinger. However, the guitarist/songwriter’s time in Badfinger was, to say the least, tumultuous. Things finally came to head in 1974 when, after the release of WISH YOU WERE HERE, their third album in 12 months, Joey walked away from the band. The decision was based on problems with management. These problems continued and were a factor in Pete Ham’s suicide in April, 1975.

Natural Gas (Mark Clarke, Joey Molland, Peter Wood and Jerry Shirley) (publicity photo)

Natural Gas (Mark Clarke, Joey Molland, Peter Wood and Jerry Shirley) (publicity photo)

After an album and successful tours with his new band, Natural Gas, Joey reconnected with bassist Tom Evans in 1979 for a couple of albums under the Badfinger banner (AIRWAVES and the hugely under-rated SAY NO MORE). That relationship fell apart, leading to both musicians touring their own versions of Badfinger. Evans, unable to shake the lingering effects of the gross mismanagement of the band’s early ’70s career, hung himself in September 1983. Drummer Mike Gibbins died in October, 2005, leaving Molland as the only surviving member of the once promising Badfinger. Though he still tours with a version of the band, called Joey Molland’s Badfinger, his recorded output since 1981’s SAY NO MORE have been released under his own name. The Molland discography is short: Before the release of RETURN TO MEMPHIS, Joey released his debut solo outing, AFTER THE PEARL, in 1983 with THE PILGRIM following hot on the heels… in 1993. THIS WAY UP, released in 2001, has been called “one of the best solo discs that ex-members of the Beatles never made.” An album of demos called BASIL was offered on Joey’s web-site in 1999.

Joey Molland onstage with Tom Evans, 1979 (uncredited photo)

Joey Molland onstage with Tom Evans, 1979 (uncredited photo)

PART TWO: RETURN TO MEMPHIS

Joey Molland Return To Memphis

On the new RETURN TO MEMPHIS (released on GONZO MULTIMEDIA), Joey’s voice has grown into a pleasant Mark Knopfler laid-back delivery, with just a hint of the young Zimmerman. Continuing the Beatles comparisons, I would liken the album to the John Lennon comeback, DOUBLE FANTASY, simply because – after an extended lay-off between releases – every song and each performance is so strong that it’s impossible to imagine that he’d ever been away.

Walk Out In the Rain” is a heartfelt, world-weary mid-tempo track enhanced by the female vocal backing and a Memphis style, Sunday-go-to-meeting organ. “A Ship To Mars” recalls Badfinger’s gentler moments, featuring a nice bass line and some excellent guitar work. More great guitar work highlights “Only When It Rains,” while “Got a Feeling” takes you back to those early Memphis rhythm and blues/rockabilly sides by Elvis Presley… one of the best songs here. Not the Paul McCartney song, “Yesterday” may be the most “modern” sounding tune here, delving into a kinda Gothic shoe-gazing vibe before heading off into more direct pop sound, sprinkled with a little Middle Eastern flavor. “All I Ever Dreamed” offers a more prominent Knopfler vocal resemblance and features some really tasty guitar work from Joey. The song, again, benefits from strong backing vocals, bass and organ. The laconic Knopfler sound is on display once more on the lyrical masterpiece, “Hero.” :All I Need Is Love” is a funky response to the Beatles’ “All You Need Is Love,” maybe taking a little bit of the wind out of the whole hippie love-fest of the late ’60s. The song is another back to the roots Memphis soul track, with some great, pounding piano. One of the things that gave Badfinger such a unique sound was Molland’s slide work. That slide work is elegantly displayed on “Is It Any Wonder,” another favorite of yours truly. The final track, “Still I Love You” is a hypnotic, Cajun voodoo kinda thing, with some awesome, fuzzed out guitar. Whether you were ever a fan of Badfinger or any of Joey’s other work (or were even aware of it), this album is a fantastic introduction to the man and his music.

PART THREE: THE INTERVIEW

THE MULE: Joey, you’re solo output is small but quite impressive. Is the length between releases by design or is it dictated by your creative process? How much does your practice/touring schedule with Joey Molland’s Badfinger have to do with your release schedule?

Joey Molland, 2013 (uncredited photo)

Joey Molland, 2013 (uncredited photo)

JOEY: My experience with Badfinger left me a little jaded and pretty broke. Our name, even though we had some success, was never a strong draw in the live concert world, so it has never been easy to make a regular living as a performer. I’ve always written what came to mind, commercial or not. Making records costs money, so I’ve had to wait for opportunities to present themselves.

THE MULE: I really enjoyed RETURN TO MEMPHIS. The album stands well as a cohesive whole, but seems to fall into two distinct styles. There’s plenty of old Memphis/Stax soul groove, while other tracks have a definite Badfinger feel. Are all of the compositions new or are some of the more “rocking” tunes older things that may not have fit (either due to time constraints or stylistic differences) on earlier projects? How did your love for Memphis soul play into the music you’ve created in the past 40 plus years?

JOEY: I always have plenty of material to use. When I was going to Memphis to make the record, I sent Carl Wise, the producer, 30 songs, written over the past 5 or 6 years. If some of them sound Badfingery, it’s probably because I wrote and sang over half the songs we – Badfinger – recorded and I played guitar on all of them. I think my songs all have a certain rhythmic element and I think that’s the Memphis/soul element. At the same time, I’ve never tried to sing like I was from Memphis, but I could never hide the influence.

THE MULE: All of these questions, obviously, lead up to this: Can you give us a bit of insight into the creative process – writing and recording – that led to the album, RETURN TO MEMPHIS? Who played on the album? Do you plan to tour in support of this release or to incorporate any of the tunes into Badfinger’s live sets?

JOEY: A long while ago some friends of mine in Minneapolis, the Echo Boys, told me they had access to a studio in town on Tuesday nights and, if I would bring a song to do, we could record it on those nights for free. Well, I said, “OK, great,” and we started. I think “Hero” was the first, but I’m not really sure. Anyway, we recorded every week and soon, come Friday or Saturday night, I’d get an idea and we’d work it the next Tuesday night and, voila, out of nowhere, a tune would come. All sorts of tunes. So, most of the …MEMPHIS CD came out of those nights with the Echo Boys.

The Memphis players were Lester Snells (piano, B3, Wurlitzer and Rhodes), Steve Potts (drums and percussion) and Dave Smith (bass) – all full grown musos. Carl and I recorded 12 demos, some acoustic and some from the Echo Boys sessions and gave them to Lester. He wrote charts as guides for everybody – all of us – and we went into Royal Studios and recorded the tracks. I played acoustic on all the basics. When we had the tracks done, I overdubbed my electric bits, did my vocals and was finished. I should say, of course, Carl directed the whole thing. He got what he needed and sent me home. He’s great to work with and understood what I was doing there. That’s why the CD sounds so natural. It was scary at first, but when I heard those girls, I lost my fear. It was a great experience for me and I’ll never forget it. It would be great to do some roadwork with them all. I do a couple of the tunes onstage now, in both my acoustic “storyteller” type shows and in the Joey Molland’s Badfinger concerts.

THE MULE: Backtracking, historically, you joined the Iveys (the band that was re-named Badfinger) after the recording of MAGIC CHRISTIAN MUSIC, a piecemeal offering that featured a few new “Badfinger” songs, including “Come and Get It.” What memories do you have of coming in under that situation… basically learning and playing those songs live, songs that you had no input, creatively?

Joey Molland onstage, circa 1971 (uncredited photo)

Joey Molland onstage, circa 1971 (uncredited photo)

JOEY: When I joined the band, they had already recorded “Come and Get It” and the three other songs for the movie and were looking for a new name. They fired the bass player and, because Tommy Evans took over on bass, they started looking for a new guitar player and I came along. They gave me the job and changed their name to Badfinger. I’d been playing cover songs all my life, although I’d written some songs in 1968 for the Gary Walker and the Rain album, so it was no big deal to learn and play those songs. The ones we played were “Come and Get It,” “Crimson Ship,” “Carry On ’til Tomorrow” and “Rock of All Ages.”

THE MULE: With the live appearances behind you and the chance to gel with the other three guys, were things easier for you going into writing and recording the next album? Obviously, with the group now featuring four strong songwriters, the decision process to decide which songs actually made it to the final cut must have been fairly difficult. What was that process like?

JOEY: We started recording before we went on the road. The process was simple: we played the ideas we had and worked them for a while; we may have demoed them, but usually we’d never heard the songs before. It would become obvious which songs would work and we’d develop those into what became our records. There was no formula. That’s clear from the different styles of songs we recorded – Folk, Rock, Pop, R and B. As long as we liked the idea, we did the song. Of course, the producers put their two cents in, too.

Badfinger, STRAIGHT UP photo shoot (Tom Evans, Pete Ham, Mike Gibbins and Joey Molland) (photo credit: Richard DiLello)

Badfinger, STRAIGHT UP photo shoot (Tom Evans, Pete Ham, Mike Gibbins and Joey Molland) (photo credit: Richard DiLello)

THE MULE: I know that you’re probably sick of being asked questions like this, but I know a lot of our readers will be interested. Please indulge us for just a couple of questions about your relationship with the Beatles. First, while the Beatles were all a few years older than you, did you ever run into any of the guys growing up in Liverpool?

JOEY: I never met the Beatles in Liverpool. I still haven’t met Paul… probably never will.

THE MULE: In Greg Kihn’s novel, RUBBER SOUL, the main character traded certain “services” to sailors coming in to port at Liverpool from the United States for American 45s. You’ve mentioned that, at an early age, you were learning Chuck Berry and Elvis Presley tunes on guitar. How did you get those American singles to learn from? If they were available at all, they must have been very expensive as imports.

JOEY: I’ve never read the book. I got most of my records from my older brother, Chris, and learned on his guitar. I was 11 at the time. Later, I would go and search the used 45s in the Liverpool stores. Friends had records, too, so one way or another, I heard the stuff. Musn’t forget Radio Luxembourg.

THE MULE: When Badfinger came to the States, I know that most journalists seemed more interested in your relationship with the Beatles and Apple Records. In retrospect, do you feel that the group’s connection to the biggest band in the world and being on their record label helped or hindered your artistic development? Did you ever get the feeling that there was a backlash against Badfinger that the band was “riding the coattails” of the Beatles? How difficult was it to handle a press rabid for information about another act?

JOEY: I’ve been thinking about this Beatles/Badfinger relationship thing a bit lately and the way it affected Badfinger’s reputation and the band’s career. Initially, we didn’t think too much about it. We were aware of people’s attitudes about the comparison to the Beatles and after “Come and Get It” was such a big hit and the teeny bop image was in cement, it made us very paranoid about our music. We knew nobody would believe we weren’t copying them, singing like them and even dressing like them. It got worse after the big rock papers said we were more together and our songs were just as good and maybe we weren’t quite as teeny bop as they first thought. We couldn’t get any gigs in the UK or America at first. Actually, in the UK, that’s never changed, Some people expected George or Paul to be with us. We took ourselves seriously but, of course, we started to doubt ourselves and each other. Why couldn’t we get gigs? Why didn’t the record label put more singles out? Were the songs too crappy, too stupid or something? We had no idea so we just stopped thinking about it and blamed ourselves: we must be crap on stage and the songs couldn’t have been that good after all. In the end, it wasn’t a band anymore – just four blokes doing what they’d always done and, when people asked us about what it’s like being compared to the Beatles, we’d laugh it off. You know, we all thought we were very lucky. There were loads of bands like us, weren’t there? Good singers and players who wrote songs, had ideas… so, we were lucky, weren’t we? From our perspective, the press and music business weren’t interested in us; they had the real Beatles, we supposed.

THE MULE: Finally, Joey, thanks for taking the time to answer our questions. Before we finish, can you let us know what’s next for Joey Molland?

Joey Molland, circa 2013 (uncredited photo)

Joey Molland, circa 2013 (uncredited photo)

JOEY: The next thing I’m planning is a book about our managers, agents, roadies and friends, but the best laid plans… I keep getting ideas for songs, so I guess I’ll keep making music. Still don’t know where the ideas come from. Maybe they’re the ones the big guys throw back.